Publicaties: Mies van Hout – Dag poes! & Øyvind Torseter – Kleine Broer



Dit artikel werd geschreven voor Kinderboeken.blog.nl en verscheen ook in de Nieuwsbrief van Boekhandel Lovink over de Kinderboekenweek 2017. Het PDF-bestand werd per e-mail verstuurd aan de geabonneerden op de digitale nieuwsbrief. Wilt u ook deze nieuwsbrief ontvangen? Stuur dan een e-mail met als onderwerp “nieuwsbrief” naar boekhandel_lovink [at] planet.nl of kom even langs in de winkel.

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Publicatie: Christopher Edge – Stein Knap en het mysterie van de parallelle universums


Dit artikel werd geschreven voor Kinderboeken.blog.nl en verscheen ook in de Nieuwsbrief van Boekhandel Lovink van Juni 2017. Het PDF-bestand werd per e-mail verstuurd aan de geabonneerden op de digitale nieuwsbrief. Wilt u ook deze nieuwsbrief ontvangen? Stuur dan een e-mail met als onderwerp “nieuwsbrief” naar boekhandel_lovink [at] planet.nl of kom even langs in de winkel.

Publicatie: Esther Sprikkelman – Bijenvader


Dit artikel werd geschreven voor Kinderboeken.blog.nl en verscheen ook in de Nieuwsbrief van Boekhandel Lovink van Maart 2017. Het PDF-bestand werd per e-mail verstuurd aan de geabonneerden op de digitale nieuwsbrief. Wilt u ook deze nieuwsbrief ontvangen? Stuur dan een e-mail met als onderwerp “nieuwsbrief” naar boekhandel_lovink [at] planet.nl of kom even langs in de winkel.

Publicatie: Jan Braakman – Verhalen van het slagveld

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Dit artikel werd geschreven voor de Nieuwsbrief van Boekhandel Lovink en verscheen in November 2016. Het PDF-bestand werd per e-mail verstuurd aan de geabonneerden op de digitale nieuwsbrief. Wilt u ook deze nieuwsbrief ontvangen? Stuur dan een e-mail met als onderwerp “nieuwsbrief” naar boekhandel_lovink [at] planet.nl of kom even langs in de winkel.

Publicatie: Nicola Yoon – Alles wat je lief is

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Alles wat je lief is Lovink Nieuwsbrief 15

Dit artikel werd geschreven voor de Nieuwsbrief van Boekhandel Lovink en verscheen in Mei 2016. Het PDF-bestand werd per e-mail verstuurd aan de geabonneerden op de digitale nieuwsbrief. Wilt u ook deze nieuwsbrief ontvangen? Stuur dan een e-mail met als onderwerp “nieuwsbrief” naar boekhandel_lovink [at] planet.nl of kom even langs in de winkel.

Publicatie: David Safier – 28 dagen

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David Safier - 28 dagen

Dit artikel werd geschreven voor de Nieuwsbrief van Boekhandel Lovink en verscheen in Maart 2016. Het PDF-bestand werd per e-mail verstuurd aan de geabonneerden op de digitale nieuwsbrief. Wilt u ook deze nieuwsbrief ontvangen? Stuur dan een e-mail met als onderwerp “nieuwsbrief” naar boekhandel_lovink [at] planet.nl of kom even langs in de winkel.

Book Review: ‘City of Demons’ by Simon Haugh

New York Skyline

Simon Haugh takes the reader back to the New York of the 1980s in ‘the first Shiver’ book City of Demons. The main character of the novel, Stanley Shiver, is a middle-aged man who lives in the attic of the Calypso, a dodgy adult movie theatre. He’s keeping the peace there and unclogs the toilets. But unexpectedly, he is also an investigator, because the widow of a former famous boxer wants to know more about her husband’s past. And then there’s the strange death of a cop. Was it suicide or murder?

demons front cover roughAt first, I thought it was quite a difficult read, because you meet a lot of characters in the first chapters and you don’t know who is actually relevant to the bigger story. But once the story starts to unfold, it does get better. You start to like Shiver, the main character, and with him, you want to get to the bottom of the two cases. The reader knows that detective Bradford Lineaker did not commit suicide, so you really want Shiver to unravel the truth.

If you are into boxing, then it will definitely entertain you, because there is a lot of talk about the boxing game. But gladly, it doesn’t take up the whole book, because there are two cases to solve. This does mean that it is an intensive read and not just a ‘quick summer read’. In my opinion, Haugh has done a good job in showing the dark side of the city of New York during the eighties. New York definitely is ‘The City That Never Sleeps’.

Life in the city may be fast-paced, but the novel is quite long and contains a lot of digressions. If I had to compare it to the detectives and thrillers from Scandinavia, I’d prefer those over this book because, in my opinion, they contain more thrilling and interesting stories. But if you would like to read about boxing, the eighties, New York and dodgy characters, then City of Demons is the book for you.

Song Review: ‘Ghost Shirt’ by All This Noise

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The West London band All This Noise are about to finish their debut album and have now released their second single ‘Ghost Shirt’. The band formed in late 2014 and their first single, ‘Seven Billion Like You’,  already sounded very promising. Now the band is ready to show what they have in store for alternative music enthusiasts.

“Don’t wait, put your ghost shirt on,” James starts off and instantly the tone of the song has been set. The tune might remind you of songs by Radiohead and the Smashing Pumpkins, who were known for their mysterious sound that would certainly catch people’s attention. The same goes for ‘Ghost Shirt’; the song has a unique message and addresses quite an unusual topic – a protective ghost shirt.

The band has added the following message to the song: “Verily I have given you my strength, says the father, says the father. The shirt will cause you to live, says the father, says the father.” This message refers to a Sioux song about a ghost shirt. The Sioux are a Native American tribe that consists of three divisions: the Santee, the Yankton-Yanktonai, and the Lakota. Today, they live in reservations and communities throughout the USA and Canada.

The special ghost shirt was supposed to make the wearer invulnerable; for the Sioux this meant that they would be immune to the bullets of the troops they were fighting against in America in the second part of the nineteenth century. The song would be called a ‘Ghost Dance song’.

All This Noise has used this theme in their new single. “We go, you follow, to show you’re not afraid,” James points out in the song, because after you’ve put on the ghost shirt, you become unafraid and “have one last chance today”. The final part of the song is the most intense; this instrumental part is very haunting and beautiful. The song ends with the powerful words “You walk on through the flames”, that shows that all the fear has been left behind. The song builds up to this moment with intense guitar riffs and drum parts.

Alan and James, the founders of the band, have expanded their live act this year with Venezuelan rhythm expert Lya on drums and together they played live on the Invaders of the Future stage at Bestival in September. You can watch the video for ‘Ghost Shirt’ below and find more information at www.allthisnoise.co.uk.

This article was written for CultNoise and published on 04.11.2015.

Book Review: ‘Still Alice’ by Lisa Genova

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Alzheimer’s disease mostly occurs in people who are older than 65. However, there is a small group  – less than 5% of people with Alzheimer’s – that has early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. About this group that is aged between 30 and 60 years old, Lisa Genova has written a powerful book: Still Alice. In 2014, a movie was made out of this New York Times bestseller that starred Julianne Moore, who recently won an Oscar for her outstanding role.

In Still Alice, we meet Alice Howland, a cognitive psychology professor and an expert in linguistics, who has a successful husband and three wonderful children. In other words, she has a perfect career and is leading a perfect life. Until one day, at the end of a simple run around the neighbourhood, she suddenly feels lost. “She wanted to continue walking but stood frozen instead. She didn’t know where she was.” Luckily, it soon all comes back to here, but later on – after a lot of tests – it turns out that this was the first real sign of early-onset Alzheimer’s disease.

still-alice-9781501107733_hrThe reader gets to know Alice just before the first signs of illness show up, so when she feels lost for the first time, you experience it with her. We see Alice as a successful woman that suddenly starts making silly, public mistakes. Consequently, this slowly starts to make her feel vulnerable and insecure.

After her diagnosis, she needs to make some painful decisions; soon she won’t be able to teach anymore, which she loved so much. One time, Alice even attends her own class and the teacher doesn’t show up. But then some of her students notice that she was there all along, just sitting there, waiting.

From then on, when her heavy work load disappears, Alice starts to feel lonely. She spends a lot of time in her office and makes schedules in order not to forget what needs to be done. At home, she starts using post-its, but soon they are everywhere. When Alice starts looking for something, she soon forgets what it actually was she was looking for and the house turns into a huge mess.

But Alice takes things into her own hands; she finds the support she needs in the early-onset Alzheimer’s disease support group that she has created herself. The hospital didn’t provide this kind of support group; they only had a support group for family members. But Alice finds out that it is great to talk to people who have to face the same battle of memory loss every day.

Lisa Genova has painted a very thorough picture of life with Alzheimer’s disease; we follow Alice step by step, season by season and notice the mistakes she makes and how the disease slowly takes away her personality. But despite it all, Alice is still Alice. Genova clearly has done a lot of research, which she also states in the preface to the novel, and with all this information, she has created a person (and a family) that could be you and me (and yours and mine) or just living around the corner.

The novel shows that anyone can suddenly be confronted with the disease and that it needs all the attention it can get. It also points out that it is a genetic disease; if someone in your family has it, then the chances are higher that you might get it – later in life – as well. If you haven’t read the novel yet and are curious about what it is like to have Alzheimer’s disease (at a young age), then this is a novel I would strongly recommend. It contains an important and beautifully crafted story.

This article was written for CultNoise and published on 18.10.2015.